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BLM Employees, Partners and Volunteers Brave Storms; Experience Annual NPLD Condor Release

mypubliclands:

On Saturday, September 27, the BLM, The Peregrine Fund and partners released three California condors in the BLM-managed Vermillion Cliffs National Monument in Arizona. The condors were hatched and raised as part of The Peregrine Fund’s captive breeding program at the World Center for Birds of…

Source: mypubliclands
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markruffalo:

mamalaz:

The Avengers as a Western

Steve is the Sheriff. Clint is his deputy. Tony is the Blacksmith. Natasha runs the Saloon. Bruce is the physician with a split personality and Thor gets into a hell of a lot of tavern brawls.

Together, however, they manage to bring order to the once corrupt town of Triskelion.

Remember The Avengers as a 70s Cop Drama? A Western might be cooler.

Yep, would watch this one, too.

Source: mamalaz
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"

We are in the habit of seeing untended nature as a sort of blankness, awaiting human work to fill it. It’s right there in the name: vacant lot. A place where spontaneous life is invisible, or at best considered so many weeds, the term used to lump together and dismiss what thrives in spite of our preferences.

[…]

It’s natural for us to elide the existence of what we don’t notice, but when we do, we cultivate our own subtle form of emptiness. In cities, so-called vacant lands account for a sizable portion of our urban space: roughly 15 percent in most cities and about 6 percent in New York City. That’s a whole lot of life we’re not noticing.

"

- Excellent Nautilus essay on the secret wildlife of New York City. More in cognitive scientist Alexandra Horowitz’s eye-opening walk with a wildlife expert in NYC.  (via explore-blog)
Source: explore-blog
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thesmartgirlsgroup:

Emma Watson, now that’s a Smart Girl!

(via smartgirlsattheparty)

Source: thesmartgirlsgroup
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todaysdocument:

The “Reel” Catch-22

Joseph Heller’s World War II novel Catch-22 often tops the lists of banned books.  Heller’s own experiences as a bombardier during the war provided the source material for many of the situations in the book.  His experience also found its way onto the big screen, by way of an Army film, “Training During Combat.”

Recently, Burton Blume, the son of the producer of the film (Lt. Wilbur Blume), helped NARA staff uncover footage of this film while tracing his own father’s experiences as a cameraman during the war.  Mr. Blume wrote a series of guests posts for the National Archives Special Media Division’s blog “The Unwritten Record,” discussing his father’s story, Catch-22 author Joseph Heller’s involvement in the film, plus a number of real life incidents from 340th Bomb Group War Diaries which likely inspired situations in the novel. 

Read the complete series below:

  1. The Unwritten Record » The Reel Catch-22, Part 1: Lt. Wilbur T. Blume, Combat Cameraman
  2. The Unwritten Record » The Reel Catch-22, Pt. 2: Joseph Heller and Training During Combat
  3. The Unwritten Record » The Reel Catch-22, Part 3: The War Diaries

I did not know this. Cool.

Source: blogs.archives.gov
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comicsalliance:

J. BONE’S SUN-FRIENDLY SUPERMAN COSTUME IS ALMOST ALL TRUNK

By Matt D. Wilson

Since the launch of DC Comics’ New 52 back in 2011, Superman’s costume has been basically trunkless, causing consternation among many hardcore fans. Best known for his contributions to DC: The New Frontier, The Spirit and IDW’s The Rocketeer comics, cartoonist J. Bone has concocted a costume that is almost exactly the opposite of the characters armor-like New 52 togs: They’re pretty much just trunks and a cape.

The idea is that Superman’s powers are fueled by sunlight, so why would he want to cover most of his body? Wouldn’t he want to soak those rays directly into his skin? With the recent trend of artists making superhero costumes functional and practical, it makes total sense.

READ MORE

Works for me. And Supe’s own physics aside, why shouldn’t male superheroes show just as much skin as  female superheroes?

Source: comicsalliance.com
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rahhhr-bia:

I made this zine for my sis on inspirational Japanese people. 

**To my dearest sister Rhiannon,
There is nothing more liberating than 
acceptance and pride of one’s own diversity.**

(via smartgirlsattheparty)

Source: rahhhr-bia
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agnostic-gnostic:

vintageblackglamour:
Elizabeth “Bessie” Coleman, the first African-American female pilot, on January 24, 1923. Coleman was a 28-year-old manicurist in Chicago when she became interested in aviation. After being rejected by every flying school she applied to, Coleman took the advice of Chicago Defender publisher Robert Abbott and went to France to learn to fly. Before she left, she learned French at a Berlitz school in the Chicago loop and, with financial support from Abbott and her own savings from her work as a manicurist and the manager of a chili parlor, Coleman left for Paris on November 20, 1920. 
Ms. Coleman performed in countless air shows over the years and encouraged other African-Americans to learn to fly before her own tragic death at age 34 on April 30, 1926. Her funeral, attended by 10,000 mourners on Chicago’s South Side, was presided over by the legendary journalist and activist Ida B. Wells.

agnostic-gnostic:

vintageblackglamour:

Elizabeth “Bessie” Coleman, the first African-American female pilot, on January 24, 1923. Coleman was a 28-year-old manicurist in Chicago when she became interested in aviation. After being rejected by every flying school she applied to, Coleman took the advice of Chicago Defender publisher Robert Abbott and went to France to learn to fly. Before she left, she learned French at a Berlitz school in the Chicago loop and, with financial support from Abbott and her own savings from her work as a manicurist and the manager of a chili parlor, Coleman left for Paris on November 20, 1920. 

Ms. Coleman performed in countless air shows over the years and encouraged other African-Americans to learn to fly before her own tragic death at age 34 on April 30, 1926. Her funeral, attended by 10,000 mourners on Chicago’s South Side, was presided over by the legendary journalist and activist Ida B. Wells.

(via smartgirlsattheparty)

Source: vintageblackglamour
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npr:

These days, you don’t have to be a model — or a real housewife of reality TV — to have a personal stylist. You can get one online, for a reasonable monthly fee. The services, in which clothes are picked out for you and sent in the mail, are catching on among the time-starved and the fashion-challenged. Like my editor, Uri Berliner.

"Most days I couldn’t even tell you what clothes I have on, what color they are," he says.

Try This On For Size: Personal Styling That Comes In The Mail

Photo and GIF credit: Colin Marshall/NPR

Wait, this is a thing? I need this thing.

Source: NPR